AS LONG AS IT TAKES

The Long Wait

  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Ed Morris, Photographer / Writer

When is a good day to capture an image? Well, there’s no such thing as a bad day. That’s how I approach my photogra- phy. When I’m out and about I’m always on the lookout for perhaps a sudden change in the light, the interplay of light and shade, the curving contours or linear appearance of a scene, maybe a striking combination of colours or of patterns and textures. They’re all out there waiting to be found, to be explored and to be interpreted in a new way. There’s always something to grab ones attention as long as you keep an open mind and an open eye.

Surfs Up
  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Surfs Up

Photo by Ed Morris

My name is Ed Morris, I’m a keen photographer in my 50s and I’m based in the city of Swansea in Wales, UK. I have access to some great coastal scenery on my doorstep and that’s where I tend to spend most of my time with a camera. I’ve always had an interest in impressionist art, from the famous 19th century French Impressionists to the more modern local Welsh painters such as Kyffin Willaims and Glenys Cour. So I guess I’m a frustrated painter at heart but I’ve used this to my advantage in that I strive to achieve something similar in terms of the end result using my eyes, my imagination, and my camera to guide me through the process.

HDR photography offers one possible route into achieving an impressionist style of photographic image as does the use of long exposure photography for scenes featuring flowing water and skies, but I was never entirely happy with my end results. That’s when I decided to use these techniques combined with images created using “intentional camera movement”, that is, by moving the camera, or indeed allowing the subject to move, during the time that the shutter is open. Compared to traditional photography, the end result is far more “hit and miss”; results can often be disappointing and very variable from image to image. Changes in camera shutter speed, cam- era movement speed and direction of movement all make a significant contribution to the end result. But get the combination right and the end results can be very effective and pleasing to the eye. As is often the case, experimentation is the key.

On Contours
  • Facebook
  • Twitter

On Contours

Photo by Ed Morris

So what approach do I take to my style of photography? I see each image as a transition that involves three distinct phases:

Firstly there is the “capture phase” – this involves combining the basic scene in front of you containing the main elements that attracted you to the scene, with the camera technique that defines your own individual style. And remember, what you see is not always what you get, so try a few different ver- sions – you will be surprised with the variety in the results that you get.

Secondly there is the “thinking phase” – this is where you see the image that you have taken for the first time and review its content. I ask myself the question “does it contain the key ele- ments that I wanted to capture and does the atmosphere that I wanted to convey come across effectively”? If it does then I proceed to the third and final phase. If it doesn’t then it’s in the bin!

In A Big Land
  • Facebook
  • Twitter

In A Big Land

Photo by Ed Morris

Thirdly there is the “refining phase”. I guess this is where I allow the frustrated painter within me to come out. I tend
to inject a lot of the final atmosphere into the image at this point, altering the balance of light and shade, exaggerating the textures where and when I think it adds to the “look” I’m after, and maybe altering the dynamic range of the image to suit. Finally I may add a figure to the scene, sometimes sharp- ly outlined, sometimes vague. They supply a focal point and provide a sense of scale to the scene. Some are positioned almost as they were within the original “still” scene and some are shifted in time and in space. This is the only use of “layer- ing” that I allow myself in this type of image. My inspiration for the use of figures came from seeing an exhibition of a piece of time lapse video work entitled “Consilience: as the world turns” by Julia Davis.

The Long Wait
  • Facebook
  • Twitter

The Long Wait

Photo by Ed Morris

What equipment do I use? Well, I have to agree with that well known saying “your best camera is the one that you have with you at the time,” so I use my iPhone as often as I use my Canon 5d mk iii (usually fitted with a 70-300mm lens). In terms of software, I use the Slow Shutter iPhone camera app for capturing long exposure images and for post-processing I use Camera Raw within Photoshop, Topaz Clarity and Pho- tomatix Pro.

On The Arc
  • Facebook
  • Twitter

On The Arc

Photo by Ed Morris

More articles, tips, coupons etc.
Subscribe to our Awesome Newsletter.

Grace’s Places – Porter Sculpture Park

Porter Sculpture Park - Montrose, South Dakota On the side of the road in southeastern South Dakota, I stumbled upon a unique sculpture park. I saw the top of these horns from a mile down the road and needed to stop. When I arrived, I discovered this “Bull Head”. It’s...

read more

Lightroom Mobile Update Includes Raw Editing for iOS

In a recent blog post, Adobe highlighted changes to Lightroom Mobile for both iOS and Android platforms in an attempt to bridge the gap between mobile post-processing and its traditional counterparts. The updates differ between the two operating systems. With the iOS...

read more

Beautiful Moments

As time goes on, it’s not as easy to get outside. It’s hard to turn away from responsibilities, com-mitments, limitations. There was a time where I didn’t get to spend any time doing what I loved, which is taking in an environment through pictures. I now appreciate...

read more
Translate »
Shares
Share This